Maitland Rail Museum

Visit the Maitland Rail Museum Marquee in the Rally Ground and talk to members of the Rail Museum.

Go back in time to the early days when steam locomotives reigned supreme.

You will see displays of interesting old tools and artefacts, historic photographs, maps and timetables as well as model trains and a model layout of the Hebden Coal Washery Plant at Liddell.

Maitland Rail Museum members will be on hand to answer your questions.

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Heritage Walks

Take a 30 minute walking tour with the Maitland and District Historical Society to learn more about the Railway Station Precinct and surrounds, including the significance of the railway to the local area.

Tours are available at 11.30am and 2.00pm on Saturday and Sunday.

The walks cost $6.00 per person and include a printed brochure.

Walks depart from the Information Tent at the Maitland Railway Station precinct.

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Traction and Portable Engine Display

2023 Traction and Portable Engines

JIM HAWKS

Manufacturer: Ruston Proctor Co Ltd of Lincoln UK at the company’s Sheaf Iron Works in Lincoln.

Year of Manufacture: 1913

Country Assembled In: England

Type of Boiler: Fire Tube

Fuel Used: Wood and Coal

Owned By: Jim & Lyndle Hawkes

Location: Kurri NSW

Restored By: Current owners and took over 6 years. The boiler work was completed by Ken Ainsworth of Goulburn.

Description of Use: The Ruston (known as Reverie) is an 8nhp double crank compound 2 speed agricultural traction engine. These engines were designed for mainly agricultural purposes such as powering (via a flat belt) threshing drums, chaff cutters, sawmills, pumps and land clearing.

This engine is also fitted with a winch that could be used to pull logs out of the bush and itself out of bogs. Water is carried in the rear tender and in a belly tank that is suspended under the boiler. Fuel is carried in the coal bunker that is located at the rear of the engine.

Timber is carried in the steel basket that hangs over the rear of the engine.
Maximum road speed is 4 miles per hour.

Ruston Proctor

Manufacturer: Ruston Proctor Co Ltd of Lincoln UK at the company’s Sheaf Iron Works in Lincoln.

Year of Manufacture: 1910

Country Assembled In: England

Type of Boiler: Fire Tube

Fuel Used: Wood

Owned By: Steven King

Location: Glen Innes, NSW

Restored By: John Gotts, Scoresby. Further work by current owner will include restoration of boiler cladding and full length canopy.

Description of Use: The “colonial type” was Ruston Proctor’s answer to competition from American manufacturers. It was lighter, with wide wheels, and easy rear access to the footplate making it suitable for ‘direct ploughing’. The use of a clutch in the smaller flywheel followed American practice, along with a longer fire box for burning wood.

This engine excelled at chaff cutting (up to 2 tons an hour) and would have towed the Bunting chaff cutter, steamer and cook house from farm to farm at it’s maximum speed of 2 mph. It was later used to drive a saw mill around which time the clutch was removed.

15 of the SHA class were imported into Australia by McKay’s of which only two others are known to have survived (41000 now owned by George Brown and 42028 owned by Neil Asplin) and if there are others the owner would be delighted to hear from you.

6HP Brittannia

Manufacturer: Marshall Sons & Co Ltd
Britannia Iron Works, Gainsborough, England

Year of Manufacture: 1907

Country Assembled In: England

Type of Boiler: Colonial

Fuel Used: Wood

Owned By: Antony Pritchett

Location: Hunter Valley 

Restored By: David and Antony Pritchett

Description of Use: Engines of this type which combined a light weight engine and boiler drove pumps Chaff cutters and other agriculture machinery.
They were called portable because they could be carted easily around the country side as needed

14 HP Marshall

Manufacturer: Marshall Sons & Co Ltd
Britannia Iron Works, Gainsborough, England

Year of Manufacture: 1911

Country Assembled In: England

Type of Boiler: Locomotive Type

Fuel Used: Wood

Owned By: Kelly and Peter Garnham

Location: Maitland NSW

Restored By: Peter Garnham and members of Maitland Steam and Antique Machinery Association

Description of Use: Engines of this type which combined a light weight engine and boiler drove pumps Chaffcutters and other agriculture machinery.

They were called portable because they could be carted easily around the country side as needed.

8HP Marshall

Manufacturer: Marshall Sons & Co Ltd
Britannia Iron Works, Gainsborough, England

Year of Manufacture: 1914

Country Assembled In: England

Type of Boiler: Locomotive Type

Fuel Used: Wood

Owned By: Ross Taylor

Location: Tamworth

Restored By: Ross Taylor

Description of Use: Used to saw Mill Equipment

Bill Ives Marshall

Manufacturer: Marshall Sons & Co Ltd
Britannia Iron Works, Gainsborough, England

Year of Manufacture: 1925

Country Assembled In: England

Type of Boiler: Locomotive Type

Fuel Used: Coal or Firewood

Owned By: Bill and Daniel Ives

Location: Brisbane

Restored By: Bob and Bill Ives

Description of Use: Marshall 80161 was built in 1925 and arrived in Australia in February 1926. The Roller was imported for the Queensland Main Roads Commission by the Queensland Machinery Company. The roller was used by main roads in the southeast Queensland area.

The last known job was the Toowoomba range west of Brisbane. It was sold in the early 1960’s to Cyril Cadwallader for preservation. It was subsequently sold to a caravan park builder who used it to build a caravan park at Caboolture. It then went to a private collector and then to a couple of tourist parks.

The last park closed, and the roller again went to a private collector. It wasn’t steamable then and he towed it to roll his driveway with a frontend loader. One day the roller got away and dragged the frontend loader down the road.

Bill bought the roller shortly after that and he and his family have had it running for over 30 years.

Steampunk

In a world as tumultuous and ever-changing as ours, it’s overwhelming to find our place in it all. Through this page, Dijor wants to encourage you to reflect on your inner strengths and longings, and use them to make something – something that is distinctively yours. Reusing energy from the past allows the generation to form a better future by utilizing these forces into constructing something extraordinary and artistic. Reinvigorating our feelings brings circles in our imagination, giving more energy and imaginative freedom at work. Dijors code is to always be here for everyone prepared to make something out of their own experiences – no matter how tough the journey might seem – to support and bolster them on the course towards self-actualization through expression.

Dijor is an upcycle admirer who loves to be resourceful with curbside treasures. He believes that the best kind of stress relief comes from getting in the right headspace and deploying artistry or imagination to express oneself. Crafting scrap materials into something beautiful can boost confidence, reduce anxiety and depression, and turn any dismal outlook around. He encourages others to find their own magic by utilizing their imagination, designing whatever they can envision, and charging themselves with their own plans. It takes energy to unleash those imaginative ideas, but it’s worth it in the end;

Through his own imaginative ventures, he encourages others to find their inner creativity, allowing them the space to push any angst or stress aside. Art has been a beneficial way to treat anxiety and depression – it can even bring confidence and hope back into life. For those struggling with Headspace issues such as negativity today, creativity is an excellent way to cheer up and spiral upwards in a positive direction. Dijor inspires us all to use our creativity freely and take our creative endeavours where we may!

Wood Carving

A chainsaw sculptor for seven years, Mark Ray will be carving it up throughout the weekend.

Head to the Rally Ground for live chainsaw wood carving demonstrations, as Mark carves wooden horse heads and crocodiles with his chainsaw.

There will be a wooden chainsaw sculpted train on display and a variety of sculptures and artworks available to see and some available for purchase.

Make sure you make time to check out Mark’s work over the weekend with live demonstrations both days at:

  • 10.30am
  • 12.30pm
  • 2.30pm

You won’t be disappointed!

Antique Valuation with Alex Renwick

It’s a weekend for antiques! Auctioneer and Valuer Alex Renwick will be conducting antique valuations in Railway Street, Maitland on Saturday 29 and Sunday 30 April 10.00am – 4.00pm each day.

Bring your objects of curiosity along with you to Hunter Valley Steamfest so together with Alex you can find out more about them. Alex has over 30 years’ experience in both Australia and the United Kingdom auctioning and valuing objects.

Beginning his old-fashioned apprenticeship as a storeman at a Rushton Fine Arts in 1986 and going on to be the youngest ever registered chattel auctioneer and departmental manager in Australia in 1989. 

Variety in his career has provided him with a wide-ranging knowledge, a true generalist so be sure to book your spot and come to Railway Street and meet Alex! Limited spots available.

Vintage Games and Penny Farthing

Sanjex Seratti is a curious engineer from the Victorian era. 

His passion for tinkering, design and building contraptions has delighted the public at numerous events. A maker at heart, Sanjex has hand crafted lawn games with a late 1800’s theme that bring back “good old-fashioned fun”. 

Try your luck on the crowd favourite “Beat The Wheel” or have some throwing fun as you take the journey of the “The Knight’s Peril”. 

He also rides prominently on his Penny Farthing and enjoys educating the crowd about early bike history and its evolution. 

So “roll up roll up roll up” and witness Sanjex Seratti with his spectacular Vintage Wonders & Entertainments down on the Rally Ground from 9.00am to 4.00pm each day.

Sanjex Photo

Steamfest After Dark

Expanding the heart of the festival, Maitland Station Precinct for the first time will be running into the night on Saturday 29 April.

Join us for:

  • An array of food trucks
  • Carnival rides for all ages
  • Live music from Wes Pudsey & the Sonic and Huckleberry & the Devil’s Dandruff
  • An up close and personal experience with the 3801 on the station platform
  • Traction engine displays

Hours will be extended until 9.00pm on Saturday night only.

AFTER DARK MUSIC PROGRAM

SATURDAY NIGHT ONLY

TIME ARTIST
5.15pm Wes Pudsey & the Sonic Aces
7.15pm Huckleberry & the Devil's Dandruff

The Rally Ground

The Rally Ground is a steam enthusiast’s dream, a bustling hive of activity, showcasing engineering ingenuity across a range of machinery from the era of steam.

With specialty steam and food stalls, Australia’s largest collections of portable, traction engines and vintage farming equipment brought together by the Maitland Steam and Antique Machinery Association, Trackless Train and the brand new people mover rides, Steam Powered Corn Cooking, Coal Shovelling, Steam Punk activities, our brand new Maker and Merchant Interactive space, wood carving, tractor pulls, displays, face painting and more there is something for everyone to enjoy while visiting The Rally Ground.

Entry to the Rally Ground is $5.00 per person. Children under the age of 16 are free but must be accompanied by a paying adult. Pass outs are available.

Carnival Lane

New to the Burton Automotive Hunter Valley Steamfest program is Carnival Lane.

Located in Maitland Station Car Park right next to our amusement rides, explore show bags, face painting, fairy floss and more. Visit a fortune teller and enjoy mystical moments, plus alluring troves of wonder and awe.

Carnival Lane will be open on Saturday 29 April from 9.00am to 9.00pm and on Sunday 30 April from 9.00am to 4.00pm.